Journal articles

Made in China, Vol.2, Issue 4: Balancing Acts

Made in China, Vol.2, Issue 4: Balancing Acts

Journal Article

Ivan Francheschini, Nicholas Loubere

This issue of Made in China includes a series of essays that examine different declinations of precarity experienced by Chinese workers. The contributions explore precarity from both conceptual and empirical points of view, focussing on aspects such as the nexus between precarious work and migration, the contentious relationship between precarity and class, new divisions of labour in the Chinese workplace, the consequences of layoffs in the state sector, and the fallout of the ongoing environmental crackdown.

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Made in China, Vol 2, Iss 3

Made in China, Vol.2, Issue 3: Chinese Labour in a Global Perspective

Journal Article

Ivan Francheschini, Nicholas Loubere

In today’s globalised and interconnected world, Chinese labour issues have become much more than merely a local matter. With China’s political and economic power increasing by the day, it is imperative not only to assess how this growing influence affects labour relations in other countries, but also to abandon an ‘exceptional’ view of China by engaging in more comparative research. In this sense, the study of Chinese labour indeed provides a powerful lens—or perhaps a mirror—to further our understanding of the contemporary world and our potential futures.

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Made in China, Vol 2, Iss 2

Made in China, Vol 2, Iss 2: The Good Earth

Journal Article

Ivan Francheschini, Nicholas Loubere

In June 2017, the government of the United States announced its intention to withdraw from the Paris Accords, severely undermining the global effort to contain climate change. Since then, China has entered the fray, attempting to portray itself as a world leader on environmental issues. While global attention has focussed on China’s top-down environmental efforts, this issue considers the engagement of Chinese citizens with state policies on the environment, and looks into their potential for articulating workable grassroots alternatives.

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Made in China, Vol 2, Iss 1

Made in China, Vol 2, Iss 1: Fare Thee Well, Chinese Civil Society?

Journal Article

Ivan Francheschini, Nicholas Loubere

With the arrest of yet another activist, the airing of yet another public confession, the closure of yet another NGO working for the weak and disenfranchised, and the passing of yet another repressive law, the world has come to view Chinese civil society as if it were on its deathbed. But maybe what is dying is just a dream of civil society with little basis in reality. While we mourn the death of an ideal, it is imperative that we overcome our sorrow to look at the momentous changes that are currently taking place in the realm of Chinese civil society.

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Twentieth century china cover

The Datong Schools and Late Qing Sino-Japanese Cooperation

Journal Article

Craig Smith

The Chinese reformers who fled their country following the 1898 reforms turned to a number of new transnational strategies of education and propaganda once they arrived in Japan. This article analyzes the Datong Schools, a system of institutions created by Chinese reformers as the first step in a planned international network for education, and shows that early Asianist cooperation among the educated elites of China and Japan played an important role in this segment of China’s modernization just a few years after the First Sino-Japanese War.

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Made in China, Vol 1, Iss 4

Made in China, Issue 4: Eye in the Sky

Journal Article

Ivan Franceschini, Kevin Lin, Nicholas Loubere

In this issue, Made in China presents three distinct perspectives on how the party-state manages and controls Chinese society. First, they consider the role of labour law in China as a vehicle for reinforcing capitalist hegemony. They then look into the limitations of the welfare system in relation to migrant labour. Finally, they challenge some widely-held assumptions about the political nature of land-related social movements in the Chinese countryside.

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Rural China

Indebted to Development: Microcredit as (De)marginalisation in Rural China

Journal Article

Nicholas Loubere

Microcredit schemes have been increasingly incorporated into development policies that aim to de-marginalise rural China. Based on in-depth ethnographic fieldwork, this paper examines the various roles that microcredit programmes play in development outcomes at the local level. It demonstrates that microcredit has the ability to facilitate the de-marginalisation of certain individuals/groups, while simultaneously (re)producing inequalities, thus exacerbating the marginalisation of others.

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Chinese Children Running

Babies and Growth: Why Less Could Mean More

Journal Article

Jane Golley

On 1 January 2016 the Chinese government formally abolished the one-child policy, replacing it with a two-child policy. The dominant reason for this change, as stressed in Chinese media reports at the time, was that relaxing family planning policy would provide part of the solution to China’s ageing problem. Higher fertility is expected to produce more than 30 million additional people in the labour force by 2050.

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Updated:  6 October 2016/Responsible Officer:  Director/Page Contact:  Admin